Week in Fashion: Sandra Bullock is a Fashion Force

No, Ocean’s 8 is still not in theaters. But the good news is that the cast is still doing press, and Sandra Bullock wore a sparkling red jumpsuit by Temperley London for an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live. We are truly blessed.

Sandra Bullock

Lady Gaga
Jennifer Lawrence
Sarah Paulson
Keri Russell
Winnie Harlow
Stella Maxwell
Cara Delevingne
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Behold: Lady Gaga Has Rediscovered Wild Fashion

Lady Gaga Lewks

So um, what exactly is Lady Gaga up to?

After she canceled her Joanne World Tour in February (due to “severe pain”) we were honestly a little worried she’d hibernate at her home on the coast of Malibu for months, shying away from the public and retreating to the quiet life she enjoyed while recording her fifth studio album, Joanne.

But Little Monsters were proven wrong just last week when the pop star returned to New York City for an over-the-top homecoming parade of outfits that could rival the Meat Dress.

Just before Memorial Day weekend, she paraded about Manhattan in a blush vintage Valentino dress plucked from the archives by her stylists Tom Eerebout and Sandra Amador. She later transitioned into elegant, Old Hollywood-inspired mini dresses like a bright red Christian Siriano tulle number she wore for a surprise performance at Rose Bar with her favorite trumpeter, Brian Newman.

Into the weekend, Gaga hopped from one movie star look to the next (and the next, and the next), not forgetting to deliver fashion that’s reflective of her pop icon status. Yes, she gave us classic Chanel LBDs and prim updos with glowing makeup courtesy of Frederick Aspiras and Sarah Nicole Tanno. However, she really played up the “What IS she wearing?” act, once again returning to those 10-inch Pleaser Beyond 1020 heels ($120; amazon.com) she loves and has performed in for years.

But where, exactly, is our favorite fashion queen going, and why is she dressing up so much? We have a theory. While recording and promoting Joanne, Gaga channeled the aura of her late aunt, who inspired her music. She wore paired-down Saint Laurent T-shirts with denim cutoffs and not much else, paving the way for a country-ish aesthetic that some fans didn’t love.

For Gaga, fashion is a reflection of her work, and of her artistic state of mind. Which means that the new fashion and sudden mix of uber expensive Delvaux handbags with skin-tight blue leather club dresses could only mean one thing: a secret project. Devoted fans have spent the past several days plugged outside N.Y.C.’s Electric Lady Studios, where she’s rumored to be working on trackswith Newman, Tony Bennett, Tyler the Creator, and Mark Ronson, to name a few.

Could a run-in with Bennett mean she’s gearing up to drop another jazzy-fueled string of songs from the Great American Songbook a la Cheek to Cheek? Or will he be included in the soundtrack for Gaga’s upcoming film with Bradley Cooper, A Star Is Born? The movie is set for an October release, and she’s reportedly dropping new music to accompany it.

Regardless, Gaga is up to something, and she’s got the looks to prove it.

Below, a sampling of what she’s worn recently, and hints and what she may have been thinking.

"Walk, Walk, Fashion, Baby..."
6 of 18 Gotham

“Walk, Walk, Fashion, Baby…”

in Gareth Pugh.
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"Should We Drop 'Haus of Gaga' for 'Haus of Houndstooth'?"

7 of 18 Gotham

“Should We Drop ‘Haus of Gaga’ for ‘Haus of Houndstooth’?”

in Ralph & Russo and Cornelia James gloves.
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Lady Gaga Lewks

8 of 18 Jackson Lee / Splash News

“I’ll Need More Baby Powder to Slip Out of This”

in Tamuna Ingorokva with a Mark Cross bag, with Christian Carino.

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"I'm Back, B—!"

9 of 18 Robert Kamau/GC Images

“I’m Back, B—!”

in Viktor & Rolf.
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<p>&quot;I Call This One 'Executive Realness'&quot;</p>

10 of 18 Kristin Callahan/ACE Pictures/REX/Shutterstock

“I Call This One ‘Executive Realness'”

 

in Fendi with a Mark Cross bag and Ryan Storer earrings.

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<p>&quot;Everyone's Wearing The Fendi Logo Again, Right?&quot;</p>

11 of 18 Broadimage/REX/Shutterstock

“Everyone’s Wearing The Fendi Logo Again, Right?”

in Mola Walker with Le Specs sunglasses, a Fendi bag, and Erickson Beamon gold hoop earrings.

 

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&quot;Can You Hurry and Get in the Uber, Dear? I'm Wearing Chanel&quot;

12 of 18 Gotham/GC Images

“Can You Hurry and Get in the Uber, Dear? I’m Wearing Chanel”

in a Chanel LBD and Delvaux bag.

<p>&quot;Is That The Papa, Paparazzi?&quot;</p>

13 of 18 Gotham

“Is That The Papa, Paparazzi?”

in a Giambattista Valli top with a Chanel skirt, Rochas boots, and Delvaux bag.

&quot;Walk, Walk, Fashion, Baby...&quot;
6 of 18 Gotham

“Walk, Walk, Fashion, Baby…”

in Gareth Pugh.
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&quot;Should We Drop 'Haus of Gaga' for 'Haus of Houndstooth'?&quot;

7 of 18 Gotham

“Should We Drop ‘Haus of Gaga’ for ‘Haus of Houndstooth’?”

in Ralph & Russo and Cornelia James gloves.
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Lady Gaga Lewks

8 of 18 Jackson Lee / Splash News

“I’ll Need More Baby Powder to Slip Out of This”

in Tamuna Ingorokva with a Mark Cross bag, with Christian Carino.

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&quot;I'm Back, B—!&quot;
9 of 18 Robert Kamau/GC Images

“I’m Back, B—!”

in Viktor & Rolf.
Advertisement

<p>&quot;I Call This One 'Executive Realness'&quot;</p>

10 of 18 Kristin Callahan/ACE Pictures/REX/Shutterstock

“I Call This One ‘Executive Realness'”

 

in Fendi with a Mark Cross bag and Ryan Storer earrings.

Advertisement

<p>&quot;Everyone's Wearing The Fendi Logo Again, Right?&quot;</p>

11 of 18 Broadimage/REX/Shutterstock

“Everyone’s Wearing The Fendi Logo Again, Right?”

in Mola Walker with Le Specs sunglasses, a Fendi bag, and Erickson Beamon gold hoop earrings.

&quot;Can You Hurry and Get in the Uber, Dear? I'm Wearing Chanel&quot;
12 of 18 Gotham/GC Images

“Can You Hurry and Get in the Uber, Dear? I’m Wearing Chanel”

in a Chanel LBD and Delvaux bag.
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<p>&quot;Is That The Papa, Paparazzi?&quot;</p>

13 of 18 Gotham

“Is That The Papa, Paparazzi?”

in a Giambattista Valli top with a Chanel skirt, Rochas boots, and Delvaux bag.

Celebrity Sightings in New York City - May 31, 2018
14 of 18 Gotham/Getty Images

“A Little Rain Can’t Stop Me”

in a lace blouse and wide-leg trousers.

&quot;Who Needs Fashion When I Have Peonies?&quot;
15 of 18 Robert Kamau

“Who Needs Fashion When I Have Peonies?”

in Azzedine Alaïa and a Delvaux bag.
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<p>Hey, Mambo, Mambo Italiano</p>

16 of 18 Raymond Hall

Hey, Mambo, Mambo Italiano

in Dolce & Gabbana.

 

Feather fashion not totally banned, nor forgotten

Ladies’ fashions in the late 19th century

Tessa Boase’s letter (25 May) relating to the Importation of Plumage (Prohibition) Act reminded me of something I deposited at the National Archives while I was part of the then Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

One of our regional offices was being refurbished and an old ledger book landed on my desk. It was a ledger of licences to import plumage. It dates from the 1921 act and continues to 1975. It lists, among other things, quotas and annual returns of quantities imported. It is in National Archives Class BT 401.

So while such feathers may have fallen from fashion, they were still, despite the campaign’s best efforts, not totally banned – and they haven’t been forgotten!

Rain Or Shine, Bella Hadid Wears These Boots Everywhere

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Bella Hadid is currently in Miami, where she’s been sunbathing and speedboating with Hailey Baldwin. It appears she has packed the requisite vacation wardrobe, sporting itty-bitty bikinis on and off the boardwalk—a styling move she has employed on several recent occasions. But it seems Hadid is less inclined to shed those heavy layers is below the ankle. When she and Baldwin went for lunch at Yardbird today, she wore her beloved Dr. Martens with a summer dress, demonstrating that the combat boot can make sense in warm weather, too.

Hadid’s no-frills footwear was just the thing to toughen up a baby blue Chanel minidress with a micro double-C motif—the ultimate designer bathing suit cover-up if there ever was one. Like her Docs, oversize gold hoops by Jenny Bird lent the look a certain ’90s slant, as did her Matrix-inspired Roberi & Fraud sunglasses—yet another accessory she’s made a signature.

Think Tank: Key Trends Driving Pervasive Intelligence in Fashion

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Jill Standish and Vish Ganapathy of Accenture offer insights for retailers as the industry learns to transcend products and services.

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In recent years, traditional retailers have been upping their game. After a wave of unprecedented disruption — driven by online-only brands that offer unparalleled convenience and choice — chains with a large physical presence have been thinking again about what they stand for and how they can succeed, rediscovering an essential attribute: their purpose.

That clearly defined purpose differentiates a retailer. It determines what value they are offering to a consumer, how they sell and even how they operate. The purpose is not only essential to reach the consumer and motivate employees, it may also benefit the bottom line. Our recent study found that consumers who scored retailers higher on purpose spent 31 percent more than consumers who scored retailers lower.

For some of the most dynamic brands, the priority has been to find new ways to engage consumers in their stores. The most successful are creating a new blended retail proposition, which takes the best of the digital and the physical and mixes them to forge powerful and much stronger connections with their customers. In doing so they are making a clear declaration of who they are, and what they are here to do — and that customers can trust them to provide not simply what they want, but what they desire.

Jill Standish Courtesy image.

This year’s Accenture Technology Vision reflects this new imperative. As technologyextends deeper into everyday lives, it shows how leading companies in every industry are moving beyond providing products and services. They are creating new affiliations with businesses across industries who share their vision and mission, and they are using these new partnerships to invent new products and services that meet the goals of their customers. Employees, in doing so, are achieving new levels of growth and differentiation.

The trends in this year’s Technology Vision will each have critical implications for retailers. We examine them below in the context of today’s (and tomorrow’s) fast-changing retail landscape:

Digital-physical: stores fight back

One thing’s for sure: bricks-and-mortar stores will, in general, become smaller and fewer in number but also more impactful. Connectivity and digitization are allowing these retailers to blur the boundary between their “brick” presence and their “click” activity. By turning shopping into an immersive experience, they can bring customers closer to the brand. Shopping remains a social sport and consumers like the physical-digital experience. However, without a clear purpose, foot traffic will decrease, and a store may well turn from an asset to a liability.

Some examples of immersive experiences found in the fashion apparel segment are around touch screen “smart mirrors” as well as digital self-checkout. Smart Mirrors can recognize the items customers bring to the fitting room via RFID and suggest ways to style them. And it’s not just personalization that promises to enhance the in-store experience; at one fashion brand, customers can use a digital self-checkout that automatically recognizes their chosen items — no scanning necessary.

Introducing innovative technology to physical stores can also assume more tangible qualities. For instance, in the San Francisco Bay Area, Lowe’s is rolling out a customer-helping robot into the aisles of 11 stores. And convenience store chain 7-Eleven became the first U.S. retailer to pilot drone delivery, with a trial that dispatched orders via drone to customers from one of its Reno stores.

To create a shopping experience that gives consumers the seamless, personalized experience they crave — traditional fashion retailers are also changing how they think about their systems. Point of sale is rapidly becoming “point of service,” where every customer interaction is tightly integrated across shopping carts, sales history and returns, and then “crunched” by AI. To support this new world, retailers are looking at their choices of technology in new ways. Take high-value, low-volume retailers as an example; several are looking into pre-integrated software-as-a-service models.

Conversely, lower-value, high-volume retailers are exploring a platform approach and wide use of open-source solutions. Regardless of the strategy, integrating the various consumer touch points will be the norm. Consumers expect seamless interactions and the retailer will be able to gain a more realistic view of the how the consumer shops with their brand.

There is one caveat to all of this new information about consumers; the responsibility that comes with knowing. All organizations should be sensitive in the way they use data to personalize experiences. There’s a fine line between convenience and intrusion: what might seem to the retailer like a valuable way to get to know the customer may seem creepy to that customer.

The frictionless business

Every company is now a tech company, and nowhere more so than in retail. The impact: retailers’ IT must be reorganized accordingly. That means incorporating agile methodologies at scale (e.g. SAFe), developing multimodal IT that can run at different speeds, and making full use of DevOps and the cloud. Balancing investments for managing legacy systems and modernizing them whilst building the next generation agile platforms is vital and it requires a “multispeed” IT design.

These shifts will help retailers refocus on delivering “solutions” via their products, perhaps using common platforms that others have developed. But replacing longstanding wholesale models will require taking some radical steps away from legacy technologies: creating flexible and responsive integration through the adoption of serverless computing and microservices.

The Internet of thinking: making friends and innovating products

For the consumer, physical retail needs to feel like it’s backed up with systems that are as quick and nimble as those used by online retailers. This is why leading retailers are increasingly thinking like tech companies, engaging the broader ecosystem and adopting the latest agile systems and thinking.

What does this mean? It’s about becoming more responsive to market shifts and consumer trends because the business model and IT architecture make it easy. It’s DevOps and the cloud, microservices and common external platforms, tech-driven partnerships and an ecosystem approach. It’s not monolithic legacy systems and processes, and it’s not proprietary information.

Without the scale of an Alibaba or an Amazon, retailers will often team up with partners and share services, data and assets. Forming partnerships with other businesses will give brands new capabilities that keep them at the cutting edge of retail — and at the forefront of customers’ minds. These new partners could be tech firms, delivery companies or even direct competitors. Building new affiliations with businesses across industries will free retailers to innovate new products and services that meet customers’ changing expectations.

Conclusion: From emerging trend to business as normal

As technology extends ever deeper into our lives, progressive retailers are finding new ways to attract customers away from online pure-plays. But making those connections count relies on using technology in a smart and responsible way. Equally, it relies on creating new affiliations with businesses across industries to invent new products and services that meet the ambitions of customers and employees. If brands get this right, customers will realize that traditional retailers can offer them the best of both worlds.

The best skirts for all ages – in pictures

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Aries, Nabil Nayal And Teija Receive BFC Fashion Trust Support

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The British Fashion Council has awarded Aries, Nabil Nayal and Teija funding and mentoring via its charitable initiative, the BFC Fashion Trust.

The emerging fashion brands join previous recipients Marques’ Almeida, Mother of Pearl, Palmer Harding, Rejina Pyo and Sharon Wauchob, who will continue to receive support this year. The winners were announced during a cocktail event at the London home of Megha Mittal, founder patron of the BFC Fashion Trust, which was born in February 2011.

Each label was chosen “for their exceptional effort and development in the areas around e-commerce, sustainability, production and wholesale expansion,” according to the BFC. In addition to the monetary grant, they will receive legal advice from Taylor Wessing, digital training from Google, mentoring on sustainability and industry best practice from Livia Firth’s Eco-Age team, and access to international campaign partners HSBC and Revlon.

Since its inception, the BFC Fashion Trust has awarded more than £2 million to 42 designer businesses, including Erdem, House of Holland, JW Anderson, Mary Katrantzou and Roksanda. So far in 2018, it has awarded grants of £380,000 between the eight designers, WWD reports.

The news follows a series of announcements from the BFC, including the appointment of David Beckham as its ambassadorial president, Stephanie Phair as chair, and Molly Goddard as the winner of the 2018 BFC/VogueDesigner Fashion Fund.

40 Photos of Pink’s Mind-Blowing Fashion Evolution

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August 1999

Before she broke out as a solo artist in 2000, Pink was in an R&B girl group called Choice. Choice broke up in 1998, and in 2000, she released her debut solo album Can’t Take Me Home. This is her at the first-ever edition of the Teen Choice Awards.

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Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

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August 2000

By the time the second Teen Choice Awards came around, Pink was on her way to pop stardom. Her first single, “There You Go,” hit number seven on the Billboard Hot 100, and she was about to release the even more successful “Most Girls.”

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Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

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September 2000

This outfit, worn to the Soul Train Lady of Soul Awards, is a perfect illustration of Pink’s early career — a weird blend of hip-hop and punk, with a whole lot of exposed midriff. I will say I am extremely here for that Joan Jett crop top, though.

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December 2000

Bitch better have her money! Pink wore this Benjamins-themed look to the Billboard Music Awards in 2000, and even matched her hair to her dollar bills. Now that’s commitment! That year, Pink took home the BBMA for Best New Pop Artist.

Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

January 2001

In case you have forgotten how special the early aughts were, this photo should give you a quick reminder. Pink is wearing a pair of graffitied overalls that are (1) painted with her own name and (2) topped by an actual bra. WHAT A TIME! This was taken at the American Music Awards, where Pink was nominated for Best New Soul/R&B Artist. (She lost to Donell Jones.)

Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

June 2001

Who can forget the “Lady Marmalade” days? Pink wore this boudoir-themed outfit to the 2001 MTV Movie Awards, where she performed the Moulin Rouge! song with Lil’ Kim, Christina Aguilera, and Mya.

Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

September 2001

Yes, this is Pink barefoot at the VMAs. Pink does her own thing at all times, OK? Anyway, she’s holding that Moonman because the aforementioned “Lady Marmalade” won Video of the Year.

Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

February 2002

One of Pink’s 2002 Grammys looks was clearly inspired by her lingering Moulin Rouge! affection, with a little bit of Beyond Thunderdome thrown in for good measure. “Lady Marmalade” won Best Pop Collaboration With Vocals.

Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

May 2003

If you’ve made it this far, then you know that Pink’s pelvic bones are a recurring theme in her earlier looks. Can you blame her, though? She’s got V-lines like a bodybuilder! Here, she’s at the 2003 MTV Movie Awards performing “Feel Good Time,” her song from the Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle soundtrack.

Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

November 2003

After a brief flirtation with brunette life, Pink went back to blonde (and pink) for her Try This release party. Try This was her third studio album, and featured the singles “Trouble” and “God Is a DJ.”

Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

November 2003

Surprisingly, this photo is not from a Halloween concert; this is what Pink wore to perform at the 2003 MTV Europe Music Awards in Scotland. That year, she was nominated for Best Female Artist and Best Pop Artist.

Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

November 2003

You didn’t think we would go all the way back to 2003 and not stop at TRL, did you? Obviously not! Have you ever seen a more perfectly 2003 outfit in your life?

Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

November 2003

Pink doesn’t always get a lot of credit for her fashion innovations, but as you can see, she was a pioneer of the naked dress before people even used the term “naked dress.” She wore this to the 2003 American Music Awards, where she was nominated for Best Pop/Rock Female Artist.

Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

January 2004

Ah, yes, another pivotal moment in Pink’s history — the Pepsi commercial that also starred Beyoncé and Britney Spears. This photo was taken at the premiere of that commercial, which is crazy, because imagine a world where a commercial is such a big deal that it requires a premiere.

Pink Style Evolution - Pink Through the Years

February 2004

Pink (the hair) returned in early 2004, and Pink (the person) decided the best way to display it would be via giant mohawk. Also back? The V-lines.

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February 2005

Pink kept the punk theme going into 2005, at a benefit concert for the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. In June, Pink proposed to her future husband Carey Hart at a motocross event in California. They married in January 2006.

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May 2006

After taking a nearly three-year break between albums, Pink returned with her fourth album I’m Not Dead in April 2006. The album peaked at number six on the Billboard 200, and the song “Stupid Girls” earned a Grammy nomination.

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January 2007

Pink’s aerial acrobatics have become something of a meme in recent years, so it’s easy to forget that she’s actually been doing this for more than a decade. This is her getting her Cirque du Soleil on as the opener for Justin Timberlake’s 2007 tour.

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February 2007

This is approximately where Pink starts to abandon things like money-printed dresses in favor of sleeker, more traditional red-carpet gowns. She’s still got a mohawk, though, because she’s Pink. At this Grammys, she was nominated for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance for “Stupid Girls.”

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September 2008

A harlequin outfit, but make it fashion. Pink didn’t win any Moonmen at the 2008 VMAs, but she did perform “So What” during the show. The following month, Pink released her fifth album Funhouse, which in addition to “So What” includes “Sober” and “Please Don’t Leave Me.”

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November 2008

Pink wore this slinky number to perform “Sober” at the 2008 AMAs. Earlier in 2008, she and husband Carey Hart announced their separation after two years of marriage. He appeared in the video for “So What,” which is about their split.

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April 2009

This carnivalesque look was one of Pink’s stage outfits for the Funhouse tour, which ran throughout 2009. Though her first album came out in 2000, the Funhouse tour was actually Pink’s first headlining arena tour in North America.

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January 2010

This earth goddess cape thing is actually hiding an elaborate, strappy leotard that Pink revealed during the eventual “Pink flies” portion of her performance. (She was singing “Glitter in the Air” at the Grammys.) In February, Pink and Carey Hart got back together.

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July 2010

A ruffly black minidress that’s hiding a studded bra, accessorized with fishnet stockings and a red garter? The true essence of Pink’s fashion sense (on display at a festival in London).

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November 2010

Pink wore this to perform “Raise Your Glass” at the 2010 AMAs. “Raise Your Glass” was on her greatest hits compilation Greatest Hits…So Far!!! and was produced by pop genius Max Martin. It ultimately became her third number-one single on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Also this month, Pink announced that she was expecting her first child; Willow Sage Hart was born in June 2011.

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September 2012

Pink attended the 2012 VMAs in this sleek gown, accessorized with her killer abs. She performed during the show, with a medley of “Get the Party Started” and “Blow Me (One Last Kiss).”

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February 2013

In September 2012, Pink released her sixth album, The Truth About Love. It debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 and was her first number-one album in the U.S. This photo is from the first date on the Truth About Love tour, which kicked off in Phoenix, Arizona.

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January 2014

Pink served full-on eleganza at the 2014 Grammys, where “Just Give Me a Reason” was nominated for Song of the Year and Best Pop Duo/Group Performance. Pink also performed the song during ceremony.

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January 2014

Pink served full-on eleganza at the 2014 Grammys, where “Just Give Me a Reason” was nominated for Song of the Year and Best Pop Duo/Group Performance. Pink also performed the song during ceremony.

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March 2014

In March, Pink classed up the Academy Awards with a truly gorgeous dress and a performance of “Over the Rainbow,” for the 75th anniversary of The Wizard of Oz. Pink has never been nominated for an Oscar, but all it’ll take is one Diane Warren collaboration to make it happen.

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March 2014

In March, Pink classed up the Academy Awards with a truly gorgeous dress and a performance of “Over the Rainbow,” for the 75th anniversary of The Wizard of Oz. Pink has never been nominated for an Oscar, but all it’ll take is one Diane Warren collaboration to make it happen.

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May 2016

Pink is making a crazy face in this photo, but I could not resist it for a number of reasons, the main one being that she’s sitting on the hands of a giant clock. The clock is because she was performing “Just Like Fire,” her song from Alice Through the Looking Glass, at the BBMAs.

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March 2014

In March, Pink classed up the Academy Awards with a truly gorgeous dress and a performance of “Over the Rainbow,” for the 75th anniversary of The Wizard of Oz. Pink has never been nominated for an Oscar, but all it’ll take is one Diane Warren collaboration to make it happen.

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May 2016

Pink is making a crazy face in this photo, but I could not resist it for a number of reasons, the main one being that she’s sitting on the hands of a giant clock. The clock is because she was performing “Just Like Fire,” her song from Alice Through the Looking Glass, at the BBMAs.

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May 2016

Pink wore this tie-dye gown to the L.A. premiere of Alice Through the Looking Glass, which she attended with her husband and their daughter. Doesn’t she seem like the coolest mom of all time?

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May 2016

Pink, in pink, from head to toe! Another Alice Through the Looking Glass appearance, this time at Jimmy Kimmel Live. Please note the aviator sunglasses — even in a feminine, flowing gown, Pink retains elements of rockstar badassery. In December 2016, Pink gave birth to her second child, Jameson Moon.

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August 2017

Another one from the same VMAs, because it was a special night. When she accepted her Moonman, Pink gave a wonderful speech about her daughter, who’d been feeling down about herself. “We don’t change,” Pink said she told Willow. “We take the gravel and the shell and we make a pearl. And we help other people to change so they can see more kinds of beauty.”

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November 2017

Pink wore this beautiful confection of a dress to the 2017 AMAs, where she performed “Everybody Hurts” with Kelly Clarkson and later sang “Beautiful Trauma” on her own. Beautiful Trauma, her seventh album, came out in October, and debuted at number one on the Billboard 200.

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December 2017

Pink attended the Fashion Awards in this gown and jacket combo. She finished off the year strong, as did Beautiful Trauma — it was seventh highest-selling album of 2017.

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January 2018

Pink wore this feathery Armani Privé gown to the Grammys, where she performed “Wild Hearts Can’t Be Broken” without doing her usual aerial ballet. She attended the show with Carey, Willow, and her mom, Judy.

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LBCC goes mad for fashion on Saturday

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Long Beach City College students show off garments that will be shown off at Saturday’s fashion show. (Courtesy image)

This weekend, it’s about the fashion.

It’s the 38th Biennial Fashion Show at Long Beach City College this Saturday, and the event is expected to be a little mad — the theme, that is.

Student designers will be showcasing their wardrobes fitting the theme “The Wonderland: Mad Fashion Show,” and thanks to a team of student production crew and talent, the show is expected to be something wonderous.

Students are what makes the show something successful, according to Pamela Knights, staff director for the event and fashion design and merchandising program director at LBCC.

“A group of students decides how the event is going to happen and then they do the work to get it set up,” Knights said. “The look and the style (of the event) is the result of their vision.”

Even the theme was envisioned by fashion merchandising student and event creative director, Asmah Guyot.

“Asmah came up with the theme and also took the lead with the art direction,” Knight added. “On top of that she was named the project’s creative director, so she had a say in the process from start to finish.”

Knights added that apart from her guidance, the students were in charge of organizing just about everything. That includes the dress designs, advertisement materials, press releases and social media campaigns.

High school fashion students also will have a chance to shine at the show.

Students from Millikan and Renaissance high schools will have pieces featured on the runway.

“We call them the ‘next generation students,” Knights said. “It’s an opportunity for them to get a sample of the fashion programs beyond high school.”

Now, the weekend is finally here and the students’ work will be put to the test.

In addition to the show and the scale of the production work, the event is an opportunity for the LBCC students to receive scholarships that help them continue their fashion schooling. Scholarships will be awarded to winning students in each event category.

Student designers include Becky Annella, Raelene Cota, Kimberly Ortiz, Tavauna Clark, Roman Ibarra, Christian Nowowiejski, Racquel Roman, Asmah Guyot, Cassie Klintworth, Diedre Hernandez and Carina Espitia.

In addition to the designers, the student production team includes Asmah Guyot, Becky Annella, Pam Kossek, Iris Chang, Haley Dellis, Jay Gomez, Anthony Reyes, Joanna Rudolph, Marissa Dueitt, Ruth Perez, Analiz Gutierrez, Natsumi Yukimura, Alyssa Hendershot, Monique Hernandez, Estefanny Olivia, Sheneake Wilson, Stephanie Estrada, Marcus Harris and Karen Fuentes, Also, there are Diaz, Tony Navarrete, Priscilla Garibay and Cindy Monge.

The Wonderland: Mad Fashion Show is happening at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 26, at the Hall of Champions Gymnasium, Building R, at the Liberal Arts Campus at LBCC, 3932 Faculty Ave.

Tickets for the show are $15 online before the event and $20 at the door. Go to the-wonderland.eventbrite.com.

The VIP reception has sold out, but Knights added that for those who did purchase tickets, the pre-show will be a “Mad Hatter” themed tea party where guests can mingle and meet a queen or two.

 

In Australia, Designers Don’t Get Political —They Just Wanna Have Fun

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PHOTO: ZAK KACZMAREK/GETTY IMAGES.
Emilia Wickstead
The Emilia Wickstead x MatchesFashion.com presentation felt more like a background scene cut from Purple Noon than a presentation between a designer and e-commerce retailer. Set to dreamy jazz, its stage, the Wylie Baths at Coogee beach, brought the capsule’s most prominent motifs to life: ruffled florals, swimwear that’s as functional as it is trendy, and even some maxi dresses for when you need to go straight from the sand to the dance floor.
Lee Mathews
It’s pretty hard to get gingham right. But Lee Mathews did that and more for resort 2019. The designer is known for creating clothes with ease, so it made sense that her latest collection stroll down a runway of grass (and include a pair of overalls that you can practically live in). Add in a few contrasting florals and a crisp blazer for work — or play — and Mathews may just be your one-stop destination for summer.
Double Rainbouu
Legend has it around Sydney that the boys of Double Rainbouu know how to throw a party. It made sense, then, that designers Toby Jones and Mikey Nolan held their latest show at the Lansdowne Hotel, one of the city’s few late-and-great landmark bars. Down the runway the models ran, showcasing the latest variations of their signatures — printed, oversized knits, graphic swimwear, and Hawaiian shirts; after the show, an open bar and pizza was for the taking. Now that’s how you do it.
Akira
You could attribute most of Akira’s resort 2019 collection to trends a lot of designers have pulled from as of recent — Marc Jacobs and ’90s glam-grunge (rose skirts in tulle atop pairs of combat boots), the Off-White effect (lofty phrases in Arial-looking typeface on belts and straps), and those Comme des Garçons suits (contrasts of florals and plaid, add in masculine ruffles). But there’s still something unique about Akira that makes you want to hold out for more.
Still Still Studio
Similar to something like the Antwerp Six, the four designers behind Still Still Studio all met at the University of the Arts London. It may be their attention to detail that’s gotten them as far as Sydney, but it’s their ability to call upon fashion’s funnest eras — a blend of the roaring ’20s, the swinging ’60s, and a dash of the ’80s — to make things things like sequins and feathers feel new again. For resort 2019, at least, the Holly Golightly vibes were as intense as the light ricocheting off those rainbow handbags.
P.E. Nation
We dare you to try not to fall in love with Pip Edwards and Claire Tregoning. The bubbly duo behind P.E. Nation are good brand ambassadors for their athleisure-meets-activewear line that, during resort 2019, saw the debut of their men’s label. At a time when high-end brands are testing out the athletic-wear market with one-off’s and collaborations and those street labels whose DNA has always been fashion and fitness are trying to keep up, Edwards and Tregoning’s interpretation of how to usher a no-fuss (read: ultra cool), Instagrammable brand into the mix not only shows their growth as a design duo, but will serve as their roadmap to global success.
Acler
Layering can be tricky, especially when you live in New York where the weather operates in extremes — but in Sydney, a brand like Acler can thrive. Long-sleeve dresses sewn onto turtlenecks next to strapless, jellyfish-like day gowns, and even a few pieces appropriate for the office, defined their latest offering. With that many options, the styling opportunities are endless.
Romance Was Born
Romance Was Born is fashion for thespians, and we’re not talking about costumes. At their resort 2019 show, which featured a Judy Garland impersonator who sang live better than the late dame herself (you can fight me on that), design partners Luke Sales and Anna Plunkett took showgoers on a trip to the moon. But really, the design chops of these two are out of this world; their clothes being both for the stage and real life.

On tap for summer: lace overlays on sweeping silk gowns in fuchsia and deep blue, mosaic prints on flapper-like shift dresses, sequined chiffon getups worthy of the red carpet, high-fashion party accessories, and more. See? Camp. The show also fêted the release of their first book, Romance Was Born: A Love Story With Fashion, which chronicles their more than 10-year, rainbow-colored history.

Blair Archibald
Like a potent decongestant, newcomer and Woolmark prize winner Blair Archibald cleared the air of MBFWA. The designer may only be a few seasons in — and, on some looks at his resort 2019, it showed — but he demonstrated promise in the Australian market. We may be used to military-style bombers and Japanese workwear, but Archibald’s clothes have more selling potential than most.
We Are Kindred
Sure, the whole “florals for spring” bit will always be pretty funny, but at We are Kindred’s latest show, no one was laughing. There’s something harmless about a floor-length floral dress paired with a larger-than-life straw hat, and well, a smile. It just works. The sibling design duo is locally known for this type of thing, but it’s their resort 2019 collection that just may bring them stateside.